The CSJ Big Sporting Dog Quiz Of The Year Check your answers here…

 

Screenshot 2019-02-05 at 14.56.38Agility

By Steven Richardson

Q1). How many championship tickets do you need to become an agility champion?
A). 3 championship tickets

Q2). What faults are incurred for a pole being knocked down?
A). 5 faults are incurred

Q3). What is the highest grade you can get to in Kennel Club shows?
A). Grade 7

Canicross

By Ben Robinson

Q4).What is the (stretched) length of the most commonly used canicross bungee line?
A): 2metres.

By Ben Robinson

Q5). What age can dogs compete in canicross competiton?
A): 1 year old.

By Lucy Matthews

Q6). What is the standard race distance for canicross?
A): 5km

Flyball

By Sam Bawden

Q7). How long is a flyball lane from the line to the box?
A). 51 foot

Q8). What consists of a multi breed flyball team?
A). 3 or 4 recognised breeds and one cross breed permitted

Q9). What is the fastest team time recorded?
A). 14.74 Tails We Win

Gundogs

By Andy Cullen

Q10).What does HPR mean?
A) Hunt Point Retriever.
Q11). Name three types of working Spaniel?
A) English Springer Cocker Spaniel Clumber Spaniel
Q12). What is a blind retrieve?
A) A retrieve the dog is sent for but hasn’t seen

HTM

By Kath Hardman

Q13). Is a dog allowed to compete whilst on a lead in HTM or Freestyle?
A). NO. A dog must be off lead whilst competing.

Q14). In Heelwork To Music, how many official positions can the dog work in?
A). 8 on the left or right hand side of the handler, facing forward or backward, across the front or back of the handler

Q15). What are the allocated maximum marks to be obtained for each of the three categories which are judged in HRM and Freestyle?
A. Content and Flow, Accuracy and Team Performance and Musical Interpretation, eachallocated a maximum of 10 marks

Obedience

By Jeannie Gee

Q16). What side does a dog usually do heelwork on in competitive obedience?
A: Left

By Mary Ray

Q17). Which is the first class that features sendaway as a test?
A: B

By Mary Ray

Q18). From which class do dogs have to retrieve the judge’s article?
A).:B

Sheepdogs

By Ceri Rundle

Q19) Who was first lady to win International Supreme Champs – when and where?
A). Julie Hill won the International in 1996 held at Chatsworth
Q20). How many handlers make up each Home Nations Team to go and compete at the annual International Championships?
A). 20 handlers (15 singles plus 1 reserve; 2 brace; 1 driving and 1 Young Handler).
Q21). Which Musketeer was mentioned in the first AWwD series?
A). d’Artagnan

Showdogs

By Emma Gates

Q22). How many Challenge Certificates must a dog win to become UK Champion?
A). 3
Q23). What does BIS stand for?
A). Best in Show
Q24). Which of the 7 groups in the UK is the border collie part of?
A. Pastoral

Sleddogs

By Mary Carter

Q25). If you want to tell your husky team to take a right turn, what command would you give?
A. Gee!
Q26. Which CSJsponsored handler won the IFSS European Championship in 2018 and the WSA World Championship in 2017?
A).John Carter
Q27). In Sleddog racing, what term is given to the metal anchor that is used to hold a Sleddog team from moving forward when racing in the snow?
A). Snow hook

 

Thank You!

Karen and Mark Laker launch a new website – Inner Agility

Moog2I always thought the off-season was a quiet time of the year… how wrong was I? The last couple of months have been as busy as ever in the Laker household. In the world of Agility Team GB we’ve been busy finishing the Performance Weekend schedule; preparing for squad day two for the juniors and adults later this month; working on the 2020 squad qualification process and trying to keep track of recent announcements about this years international events – not exactly a quiet time. And then….

Karen and I launched our new website – Inner Agilityhttps://inneragility.co.uk/ This has been something we’ve been meaning to do for a while. We decided it would be done in 2019. The idea is to bring together all our activities into one place. There’s still some tidying up to do with various social media sites, however the main piece of work is done thanks to our web designer friend Niall.

Following on from my recent article about forming habits I’m pleased to say so far, I’ve kept to the new habits I’m trying to establish…mostly! There is the occasional day where something comes along that prevents me from achieving the days objectives. Interestingly, it now annoys me and makes me more determined to achieve it the following day. I also have to be creative to achieve some habits when day-to-day activities get in the way. For example I set out to achieve 10,000 steps a day. This is doable on a usual day, but when I have to travel on business it’s quite hard…even with some of the long walks in airports. However, I’ve found that asking for a hotel room on the 10th floor and using the stairs rather than the lift I can not only achieve 10,000 steps but also achieve the days calorie count. Why is it that climbing stairs never gets easier…

I’ve attached a picture of my young lad Moog enjoying the recent snow we experienced while staying with family. I’m no photographer but I’m quite pleased with this one.

Sven and Blitz from the Netherlands were selected for Crufts 2019

In August last year agility handler Adelaine Bastiaansen’s son Sven Bastiaansen and his dog Blitz from the Netherlands were selected for Crufts 2019. In the photos below, you can see the kit that agility handler Adelaine designed for Sven and his Coach.

 

Sven and Blitz will running the jumping for kids up to 12 years old. Good luck Sven and Blitz! Find out more about Adelaine Bastiaansen

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Habits are fascinating traits… So how do they work.?

By Mark Laker
I signed off last month writing about habits and said I would share some thoughts in this months article. Hopefully you’ve created a habit at reaching for the next CSJ article so you’re keeping up with my writings and were expecting this piece.

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Habits are fascinating traits

We have them, animals have them, we consciously and unconsciously create them, we find bad ones hard to break and good ones hard to create. So how do they work.?

Our brains have evolved to create habits out of repeatable tasks. For example: breathing, blinking, swallowing. We don’t have to consciously think about performing these acts they’re habits or processes that are running in our sub-consciousness all the time. This allows our conscious brain to focus on the immediate things around us that mostly related to our fight, flight or fight instincts. e.g. don’t walk out in front of that bus, don’t put your hand in the fire etc…

Other habits like smoking, drinking, gambling are difficult to break because our brain gets a shot of dopamine –  a reward-motivator, each time we perform the habit which makes us want to repeat it. The habit loop is a bit more complicated than this, but essentially we get a reward for performing the habit when we receive the cue or get the desire.
There are other types of habits that we can apply to sport, goal setting and objectives – this is where it gets interesting. Latest research shows that creating a habit to achieve something you want can be more effective than goal setting. Now before you rip up your 2019 goals, targets and objectives (what do you mean you haven’t written them yet!). I should make it clear that there isn’t a one-size-fits-all when it comes to creating habits, it’s down to individuals.

Like blinking and breathing if we can perform a repeatable task enough times, our brains commit this to our sub-conscious and hey-presto! It’s a habit …. we don’t have to think about it any more, it just happens. Like tieing shoe-laces or riding a bike, once learnt you don’t have to re-learn it.

As an example, if we do something everyday that takes us closer to our goal e.g. 15 minutes training our dog, or 20 minutes walking, or fitness training, or researching a new training technique eventually we’ll create a goal-related daily habit.

Research has shown that your sub-conscious takes over and natural instincts start guiding you towards your goal.

I’ve been experimenting with this idea for six months and so far its working for me. I’m finding my formed habit now finds time in my schedule each day for activities that take me closer to my goals.

Habits are fascinating traits if you’re interested in finding out more about how they work and how to break them read ‘The Power of Habit’ by Charles Duhigg.

Have a great Xmas and New Year.

Mark
Mark Laker
Agility Team GB International Team Manager

Our brains are hard-wired to the fight/flight/freeze behaviours

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By Mark Laker
Back to Basics


‘This is a different sport to the one we play at home’ a comment I heard at the FCI Agility World Championships from a Team GB handler. It’s true that the speed, the technical challenges and the level of competition was at a different level to UK domestic agility. However the basic principle of the sport remains the same, a clear round trumps faults.

 

In our quest for speed or to master a particular skill it’s easy to forget the basics

 

Our brains are hard-wired to the fight/flight/freeze behaviours. Our sub-conscious is constantly scanning the environment to protect and motivate us. So it’s easy for our brain to interpret dogs running faster, handlers performing a new ‘sexy’ handling manoeuvre to process that to mean ‘I need to be doing that to survive (fight)‘ or ‘I don’t like/not interested in that, I’m off…’ (flight).

 

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But there is a more developed part of the human brain that processes logic, its the part that allows us to stop, stand-back and consider the bigger picture (must get a clear round). However our nature is to conform and to be part of a pack, so to process that logic isn’t the easy option.

 

How do we become aware of when our reptilian brain is ruling our developed brain?

 

There is no one answer, it depends on many influencing factors. However, a behaviour humans (and dogs) are good at is developing habits. Habits automate processes which enable us to carry out repeatable actions without thinking about them… when was the last time you thought about having to blink!

 

Maybe a way to remember the basics e.g. getting a clear round is to develop habits that build the skills required to produce clear runs.

 

I’ll write about the power of habits next month.
Mark
 
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FCI “Without doubt most exciting and fastest agility championships ever.”

By Mark Laker
‘Running at the FCI Agility World Championships was without doubt the most exciting agility I’ve ever experienced’. The reaction from one of Team GB’s handlers following this year’s competition in Sweden.
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Dave Munning’s and his Border Collie Fame came away with a Bronze medal in the individual class for large dogs, a fantastic result for Dave. After three years on the team, he achieved the result he’d been working so hard for.
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Team GB had a successful championships

This years team included many young dogs with handlers new to this level of competition. One of the team members fed back that ‘nothing can fully-prepare you for the emotions, pressure and excitement you experience when you’re stood on that start-line. There really is no other international agility competition like it’.

This year’s preparations included more focus on the team culture and building strong bonds that are essential for carrying the team on when the pressure to perform is turned up. Thanks to our sponsors, we were able to provide more team activities in our build-up this year; I’ve no doubt that this was a major contributing factor to the team winning medals at all three major international championships.

Another comment I heard from team members was ‘this is a different sport to the one we play at home. The speed, the accuracy, the technical elements are extraordinary’. We’re going to have to re-think our game’.

It’s true, I have never witnessed agility dogs competing at those speeds before neither have I seen the pace and fitness levels needed by the handlers.

It was without doubt most exciting and fastest agility championships ever.
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Mark
International Agility Team Manager