CSJ’s founder ‘leads’ the way

LYNDA WARD
pet trade SOLUTIONS

lyndaward@pettradesolutions.com tel: 07946 743784

https___cdn.evbuc.com_images_58668505_205612079600_1_original

Press release – 17.7.19

As one of 4 finalists in the Leadership in the Private Sector category of the prestigious 2019 Leading Wales Awards® Ceri Rundle was invited to attend a judging panel on Friday July 12th at the Hilton Cardiff.

The Leading Wales Awards® were developed by a consortium of professional institutes, voluntary and public sector bodies as well as private companies. The Awards seek to identify, recognise and celebrate personal achievement in outstanding leadership in Wales.

This final stage – having been selected from shortlisted candidates from businesses as diverse as engineering and data – saw Ceri interviewed by a panel of 4 including 2 previous winners.

With a theme in this year of “Daring to Lead®” the judging criteria had sought individuals in Wales whose leadership is courageous, inspirational and transformational.
Ceri whose background took her from breeding, working and trialling her Border Collies to developing her own brand of natural food, treats and herbs for working and active dogs says, “My husband Phil and I are looking forward to attending the awards ceremony on September the 26th…in such strong competition who knows the final outcome, but it has been an honour to have progressed to the final 4!”

For more on CSJ products visit http://www.csjk9.com or call 01745710470
… and follow CSJ winners on:

Facebook: https://facebook.com/specialistcaninefeeds/
Twitter: @CSJDogFood
Instagram: @CSJDog_Food
YouTube: CSJ Specialist Canine Feeds

Sheepdog trialling IS a sport

By Ceri Rundle

I read a post earlier in which someone said that sheepdog trialling was not a sport. In my opinion it is and should not be perceived as being something negative either. ‘Sport’ in general can bring communities (even the whole country at times) together where people/handlers compete against each other and strive to be the best or to get better. This then inspires others to get involved, enjoy the sport and improve themselves to hopefully one day beat these same handlers/sportsmen.

Over the years this competition has improved the handling skills and level of training put into our dogs that are like athletes nowadays with improved welfare, knowledge of nutritional needs and general health and condition. Even simply worming of pups/dogs years ago was alien to many people. A trial can be a really fun place with lots of banter and handlers mixing in to help make the competition a fair test – well that is what we strive for (and achieve) at Bodfari.

Anyone who isn’t willing to muck in has a choice and it is their loss. People will always make the time-old argument that the dogs of today are not as good as those of yesteryear… In some respects maybe but that is probably attributable to the fact there are fewer shepherds ie the dogs getting less rough work. Those dogs probably wouldn’t even have set paw on a trials course until they were nearly 3 years of age.

Nowadays there is far too much expectation and pressure put on youngsters that are really still only pups in their heads. So many do not get the proper chance. However the standard of handling/training generally IMHO has greatly improved. How many years ago was it where many dogs failed to Turn Back at the International or did it very badly? Nowadays, the handlers train for it. Some might argue that the dogs today are trained purely for running trials courses – yes maybe but many are still working for their living too. The likes of Ricky Hutchinson etc have top quality stock and use their dogs to manage them on a daily basis but they can then go out and win. Who wants to go to a trial and see a plain farm dog, maybe tail in the air, working? It might be an absolute star of a dog working at home on the flock but….horses for courses… Anyway those are my muddled thoughts this morning…!

 

New series of ‘A Way with Dogs’ coming soon…

Watch ‘A Way with Dogs’ 2017- Sheepdog Trial film series and get ready for  the new series of ‘A Way with Dogs’ 2018 – to be filmed in September 2018. More

https://www.csjk9.com/a-way-with-dogs.asp

Stellar line-up for CSJ’s next ‘A Way With Dogs’

Press release – 6.6.18

CSJ’s first 4 part ‘A Way With Dogs’ competition aired online in 2016 gained a global following and was so popular that top UK and overseas sheepdog handlers have been queueing up to enter series 2.

This year’s 15 competitors are sure to keep viewers on the edge of their seats again as they negotiate the unique trial set in the beautiful landscape of North Wales and vie for the specially commissioned bronze trophy and the title of ‘A Way with Dogs’ Champion 2018.

IMG_9026

The stellar line includes ever popular Katy Cropper – in 1990 the first lady to win TV’s One Man and His Dog – plus renowned triallists:

Sergio Perello – Reserve English National Champion 2017

Toddy Lambe – International Supreme Champion 2004

Nigel Watkins – Reserve World Champion 2005

Torbjorn Jaran Knive – World Champion 2017

Angie Driscoll – Welsh National Champion 2017

Ricky Hutchinson – International Supreme Champion 2017

Mosse Magnusson – Scandinavian Champion 2009

Aled Owen – 2 x World Champion 2002, 2008

Neil Gillon – Scottish National Champion 2017

Derek Fisher – US National Reserve Champion 2017

Kevin Evans – 2 x International Supreme Champion

Michael Gallagher – International Supreme Champion 2010

Allistair Lyttle – Irish National Champion 2017

James McCloskey – 2 x Reserve Irish National Champion 2016, 2014

With hundreds of titles between them and long lists of accolades too many to list here visit https://csjk9blog.com/awaywithdogsseries2/meet-the-a-way-with-dogs-handlers/   to see just how tough the competition will be!

CSJ are delighted to have retained their presenters – Bryony Billson and sheepdog triallist, Mike Northwood for the trials which will be filmed to make 8 online programmes on CSJ Specialist Canine Feeds YouTube channel… CSJ’s founder and sheepdog triallist Ceri Rundle says, “I can’t imagine that there could be such a stunning gathering of handlers and dogs again.”

For more info on CSJ products visit www.csjk9.com or call 01745710470

… and follow CSJ winners on

Facebook: https://facebook.com/specialistcaninefeeds/

Twitter:  @CSJDogFood

Instagram: @CSJDog_Food

YouTube:  CSJ Specialist Canine Feeds

Press contact

Lynda Ward
Pet trade Solutions
lyndaward@pettradesolutions.com tel: 07946 743784

 

 

Cats go wild for CSJ’s new cat food!

20170408-7116-Edit-Edit-2

PRESS RELEASE

CSJ’s nutritionists aimed to formulate protein, fat and carbohydrate content close to that preferred by cats and of a natural diet in CSJ’s new Command Purrformance feeds.

In two complete extruded rations – for Active Adult cats and for Mature cats the crunchy texture (which helps promote healthy teeth and gums) and high percentage of animal fats and protein has sent cats into raptures in trials.

Command Purrformance for Active Adult Cats is suitable for all and preferably active adult cats and may be fed as part of the daily diet to kittens. With ingredients including poultry meal, sweet potato, marigold flowers and spinach it is formulated to help maintain urinary pH near to optimum when fed free choice, help maintain muscle mass and help support healthy heart and eyes.

Command Purrformance for Mature Cats is suitable for all and preferably ageing and geriatric adult cats. Containing a mix of animal proteins, enhanced protein quality and quantity to help maintain muscle mass in old age, the blend which includes duck, poultry, salmon, green lipped mussel and cranberry extract has the benefit of healthy ingredients yet with a yummy taste – which is so important to all cats and often lacking in a mature cat food.

Made in Britain and packed in 1kg metallised foil sachets with a 12 month shelf life and an RRP of £5.50 new Command Purrformance for cats is an eagerly awaited addition to CSJ’s renowned natural dog food, herbs and treats ranges.

For more details, talk to your local stockist

 

 

Bodfari Sheep Dog Trial

Screen Shot 2017-03-29 at 15.19.18
By Ceri Rundle

There will be two days of sheepdog trials taking place at Bodfari on Good Friday, 14th April and Saturday 15th April 2017, in aid of next year’s Welsh National Trials, which will be held in Denbighshire.

Bodfari trials always used to be the first of the season in Wales and attracted handlers from all over the country including England and Scotland so it was always over subscribed.

This will be the first time we have held the trials at Easter for many  years.

Good Friday:  2 Opens and Novice Classes

Saturday: 1 Open

Judges

Kevin Evans will judge one of the trials on Friday
Gwynfor Owen will judge on Saturday

CSJ.K9 Ltd,
Bwlch Isaf Farm,
Bodfari,
Denbighshire,
LL16 4HS

Enquiries to: ceri@csjk9.com

Ceri Rundle talks about ‘A Way with Dogs’ on BBC Radio Wales

Watch A Way with Dogs: http://www.csjk9.com/a-way-with-dogs.asp

Did you hear Ceri on BBC Radio Wales this morning? Here she is: speaking live to Caryl Parry Jones on BBC Radio Wales about our new  sheepdog trial film series of ‘A Way with Dogs’ available on 14th November 2016 on: http://www.csjk9.com/a-way-with-dogs.asp

You can listen here at 49.04 – 55.04 on BBC iPlayer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07zf8cq

Listen to our recording of the show here:

ceri-mike-bryony-watching-jrQuotes from Ceri

“I wanted to produce something that reflects the sport”

” When we talk about clever dogs, I always assume they mean bitches”

“I called on a friend  and a very, very good handler, Aled Owen”

“Obviously my father would have normally been here on hand to support and criticise… H. Glyn Jones… was well known. He had two dogs, Gel, who was trained in Welsh and Bracken who was trained in English… the public took them to their hearts””

“We’re looking for a nice controlled run… straight lines… tight turns”

Ceri and her father – H. Glyn Jones

screen-shot-2016-10-28-at-12-48-24

Autumn Novice & Open working Test for AV Spaniels

Results from Anna Sole

 

Leaconfield2Sunday 4th September 2016 at Cocking Forest, West Sussex

By kind permission of Hon C.A Pearson

Judges: John Johnson A Panel 1978 & Linden Jones NP

IMG_0807“Thank you very much for the prizes”

Novice

1st and winner of the Raker Trophy

       Manselpark Finest AR01349606 09.08.14 Cocker F

Sire Tiptop Jack Dam Breckmarsh Bliss

Breeder J Smith Handler/owner Len Earl

2nd Breezybrook Hot Toddy AR01706303 09.04.14 Cocker M

Sire Chyknell Jackdaw of Breezybrook Dam Breezybrook Troupers Dream

Breeder J Ward Handler/ owner Simone Cunliffe – Lister

3rd Kenquartz Perwinkle AR01169801 28.01.14 ESS M

Sire Tylacoch Smut dam Lemonshill Ferny Hill

Breeder R Hall Handler/ owner Shane Walker

4th Shantae’s Little Tinker AM01095204 13.03.12 Cocker M

Sire Lomcovak Darjeeling Dam Royal Rebecca

Breeder C Colin Handler/ owner Trisha Healy

Open

1st and winner of the Bitterroot Trophy

       Wiltonsprings Cleo AR01629303 12.05.14 ESS F

Sire Cowamecourt Gaffer of Edgegrove Dam Lucy the Lady

Breeder J Etherington Handler/ owner Julie Etherington

2nd Moonreed Magic AR02847901 03.08.14 ESS F

Sire FTCH Belveden Vatanen Dam Kidnais Spidder

Breeder M Light Handler/ owner Anna Sole

3rd Molly of Gunters Bridge AL03135804 ESS F

Sire Baxter of Tattletow Dam Mitford Toubkal

Breeder R Pinnock Handler/ owner Sue Gilbert

4th Shantae’s Modesty Blaise AQ00726605 01.02.13 Cocker F

Sire Sherbet Dabb Scherzando Dam Royal Rebecca of Shantae

Breeder C Taylor Handler Julie Etherington Owner C Bridgewater

COM Valnew Hallebo at Wiltonsprings AR03296506 08.09.14 Cocker M

Sire Wharfewright Marlow Dam Perfect Beaming Bracken

Breeder T Stone Handler/ owner Julie Etherington

 

 

 

Clwyd Retriever Club Open Annual Working Test results

Posting by Mary Roberts

Open Annual Working Test results from Checkley

1st -Wesley Travis with Brackenbird Lucas
2nd- Judith White with FTCH Labdom Lewis of Minstead
3rd – Victoria Stanley with Patanavac Brough
4th – Philip Goulden with Tearsol Magnus

C of M – Jacqui Eyre with Highhouse Bran
C of M – Gary McCarthy with FTW Muggleswick Samba

Wesley Travis with Brackenbird Lucas also won the Mary Roberts Trophy

… and the winner of the Whitter trophy for the highest scoring dog from all the annual Working tests in 2015 is Innes Jones the winner of the Novice test.

Find out more about Clwyd Retriever Club:http://www.clwydretrieverclub.co.uk/

Results of the Cywyd Retriever Club Annual Working Test at Gwysaney – June 30th 2015

Report by Mary Roberts

Annual Working Test 2015 for Puppy & Novice results

PUPPY 6-12 MTHS

1st     Jeanette McGuirk with Kelmagra Cedar- DOB 09/07/14

2nd    Raymond Roberts with Minstead Bellamy – DOB 11/07/14

3rd    Nick Bryan with Mossborough Martin – DOB 08/09/14

PUPPY    12- 15 MTHS

1st     Eirwyn Roberts with Courtpark Britannia -DOB 17/05/14

2nd    Bronwen Gradwell with Kenquartz Dangerous Love -DOB 14/05/14

NOVICE

1st     Innes Jones with Gwyrchbedw Quail

2nd    Lee Murphy with Kentelv Sky Walker

3rd    Jackie Owen with Suki Akira of Marianbach

4th    Jackie Owen with Muggleswick Cha Cha of Marianbach

COM Ken Howell with Barleysett Larch

COM Lynne Lewis with Ringneck Phoenix of Gwyrchbedw

Thank you to all the competitors, judges and helpers for making todays puppy and novice annual working test a great day with special thanks to Gareth Lewis, Lee Murphy & Glenys Caldwell who have worked hard to create another fantastic working test for the club.

More gundog news on our website

Sian the Sheepdog

By Wendy Beasley

Moel Sian was bred by Ceri Rundle of CSJ fame from her very good Moel sheepdog line, but never really did what she was bred for. Circumstances at the time meant that she didn’t really get started with the sheep and before long she proved her worth as a very good brood bitch, producing fine working dogs, and so never really got back to her day job. When Ceri heard that I was looking for new blood to introduce to my Stardell line she suggested that Sian might suit me and after a trip to Wales to meet her we were very happy to bring her home.

Sian the SheepdogThis was a decision I have never regretted as well as being a really lovely dog she has been an exceptional brood bitch and has fitted in to our family as if she had always been with us.

Her pups have gone on to excel in working trials, agility and obedience and I am more than happy with the one I am currently working. She has also acted as surrogate Mum to the young dogs we have taken in for training including a boisterous male GSD that was more than twice her size. Her gentle correction and reassurance puts youngsters at their ease, and absolutely nothing frightens her, so she really is a steadying influence.

We do working trials and over the four years that we have had Sian she has travelled the length and breadth of the country with us and been calm and confident in all sorts of new and challenging surroundings, something she clearly did not learn on the Welsh Hill Farm that had been her home for her formative years. She had moulded seamlessly into our pack, and although her breeding days are over and she has settled into a happy retirement we wouldn’t be without her, and consider her as much a part of our family as the ones that grew up here.

Sian is one of the six border collies we have at the present time with three working and three retired. When we go out training all the dogs come with us and once the training is over the “oldies” get a run so this is how we set out last Saturday, when we went out to do some tracking. We are lucky that we have a choice of land to work on, but on this particular day we chose to go just up the road and work on the small meadows in our village.

One of the meadows is rented by a hobby farmer who has sheep on it, but the other three are empty allowing one each for the dogs to track. As I was finishing the last track with my dog I saw someone leaning on the gate watching, and as I got closer I recognised her as Judy the owner of the sheep. She asked me if any of my dogs would herd sheep as she was trying to treat one of them for fly strike but could not get near it to spray it. Although we knew that ours had all been rigorously trained to ignore sheep, Paul pointed out that we did not know if Sian would be any use so decided to try her.

Armed with a long tracking line Paul and I decided to try to corner the sheep with the line between us acting as a visible barrier and at this point we kept Sian on the lead. This did not work as the sheep were far too fast and kept skipping around the ends, so at Judy’s suggestion and with her agreement we decided to let Sian off the lead and see what she could do. Her reaction was instantaneous, and at nine years old and with sheep just a distant memory instinct took over and she went into full sheepdog mode.

With absolutely no hesitation she gathered them all together and pushed them towards us, keeping them in a tight bunch by constantly circling. We were unsure quite how to shed the required sheep but as I moved towards it, it moved slightly away from the rest, and almost as if commanded Sian shot in and drove it away from the others just like something from “One man and his dog.”

She pushed the one sheep up against the fence and along towards the corner as Paul and I moved in with our tracking line. The sheep decided to front it out and stood and stamped its foot at her, whereupon she shot round the back and bit its leg and it decided to move after all. Once we had it penned in the corner Sian dropped to the floor and watched and Judy was able to hook the sheep in her crook spray it and let it go. Sian was all for getting it back but understood the “That’ll do” command which is the only one I know, and she followed us out of the field.

Unfortunately as we walked back to the van I noticed she was looking a little the worse for wear and realised that working so hard in the 28 degree heat at nine years old had taken its toll on her and she was suffering from heat stroke. Luckily we were not far away from home so were able to get her there quickly and hose her down which soon put her right, and after a couple of hours rest in a cool kennel she was ready to go again. Judy was so delighted that she brought round a bottle of wine the next day although I felt a big juicy bone would have been more appropriate.

Sian is now a bit of a hero in the village as everyone has heard of her moment of glory, and although all her kennel mates have done great things in trials none of them could claim to be proper sheepdogs.

So Sian is a sheepdog and even after maternal duties and change of lifestyle it is still all there, but you can’t have her back Ceri!